jazz guitarists using rectos

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rabies
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jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by rabies » Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:38 am

Lee Ritenour: http://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneo ... nour/12204
with the road king (ch. 3?)

any other jazz artists using a recto? i recently learned that vernon reid uses rectos live.

i'm about to buy a used roadster tomorrow. do all the roadsters have that excellent clean channel like the mark V? thx.
nothing is more powerful than dynamics in the world of music; tone is secondary

Chadd
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by Chadd » Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:52 am

rabies wrote:Lee Ritenour: http://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneo ... nour/12204
with the road king (ch. 3?)

any other jazz artists using a recto? i recently learned that vernon reid uses rectos live.

i'm about to buy a used roadster tomorrow. do all the roadsters have that excellent clean channel like the mark V? thx.
Two clean channels with a total of four modes. You can get some amazing tones out of the Roadster's clean channels.

Given To Fly
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by Given To Fly » Mon Jun 23, 2014 8:53 pm

rabies wrote:Lee Ritenour: http://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneo ... nour/12204
with the road king (ch. 3?)

any other jazz artists using a recto? i recently learned that vernon reid uses rectos live.

i'm about to buy a used roadster tomorrow. do all the roadsters have that excellent clean channel like the mark V? thx.
You are making a good purchase! :wink: You will soon find out if the Roadster's clean channels are comparable to the Mark V's clean channel.

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LesPaul70
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by LesPaul70 » Mon Jun 23, 2014 11:24 pm

I actually prefer the Road King II/Roadster cleans to Mark V cleans...both sound great, yes, but the feel is very different. The Mark V cleans can be a bit stiff or rigid for certain applications. The RKII/Roadster cleans are more relaxed, smoother, deeper and bigger-sounding.
But as I said, both sound great. The guitarist's fingers will make a bigger difference than the difference between those clean sounds.

As for jazz guitarists using Rectifiers, Allan Holdsworth has been often mentioned. An early Dual used to be his all-time favorite amp. True, it was a Rev C, which is a very different beast than the later Rectos (although I'd be surprised if a RKII, with all those voicing options and switches, couldn't get you at least close).

And you could also make a case that Allan Holdsworth isn't really a jazz guitarist. (I'm not sure what he is, actually - he's a bit difficult to categorize.)

rabies
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by rabies » Tue Jun 24, 2014 12:37 am

the roadster craigslist deal didn't work out (seller didn't show up). I bought a Axe FX II XL today. expensive but sounds like that thing is the true new sick.
nothing is more powerful than dynamics in the world of music; tone is secondary

Shemham
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by Shemham » Tue Jun 24, 2014 8:40 am

LesPaul70 wrote:As for jazz guitarists using Rectifiers, Allan Holdsworth has been often mentioned. An early Dual used to be his all-time favorite amp. True, it was a Rev C, which is a very different beast than the later Rectos (although I'd be surprised if a RKII, with all those voicing options and switches, couldn't get you at least close).

And you could also make a case that Allan Holdsworth isn't really a jazz guitarist. (I'm not sure what he is, actually - he's a bit difficult to categorize.)
I'd categorize him as fusion player if I had to. I think he stands somewhere in the middle ground between, jazz, classical and rock in tone and compositional aspects.

In any event, he was one phenomenal Recto user. I first had hard time to recognize that what he used in Hard Hat Are and None Too Soon as Dual Rectifier. Then again, he employed boost pedal by TC, load box to crank the power section of the amp and parametric EQ to further fine tune the tone.

Apparently one of the reasons he liked the Dual Rectifier was the tube rectifier. In one guitar clinic (available in Youtube) he stated that he considers the rectifier tube to be the most important tube saying its sag allows the amp to "breath" more.

rabies
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by rabies » Tue Jun 24, 2014 9:40 am

Shemham wrote:Apparently one of the reasons he liked the Dual Rectifier was the tube rectifier. In one guitar clinic (available in Youtube) he stated that he considers the rectifier tube to be the most important tube saying its sag allows the amp to "breath" more.
thats what i loved about my ex-RK1. it's great for playing along with kind of blue.....

i wonder if Axe FX emulates tube rectifier???
nothing is more powerful than dynamics in the world of music; tone is secondary

bandit2013
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by bandit2013 » Sat Jul 12, 2014 12:06 pm

Since you went a different route, probably too late to chime it.

What the heck, may as well write something (probably better if I did not) :wink:

Mark V clean channel (clean, fat, or tweed) in comparison to the Roadster's two channels clean, fat or tweed of CH1.

I like both actually. I recently converted my Mark V head into a combo shortly after getting the Roadster. I wanted to take advantage of the class A power section with an open back cabinet. To get a really dry piano like or acoustic guitar tone, a combo or open back cab is the way to go. There are some great qualities to a sealed 412 but it is harder to obtain certain tone qualities of a properly tuned cavity with an open back enclosure. Not a loss here since I can still use either or both of my 412 cabinets with the Mark V. Since I have a Roadster head as well as an RA100 head, I did not have enough room for another 412 cab.

Roadster is all about Class A/B ( as is the RA100). I have really grown fond of the warmth and articulate character of the RA100 so the next best thing was the Roadster. Having the ability to operate at 100W for that optimum headroom with the clean channels and selection of silicon diode or tube rectifier tracking really makes the Roadster a champion performer. The Roadster can provide a dry tone and crisp piano like clarity through a sealed 412 cabinet. The Mark V is quite similar as well. There is a difference in character between the two amplifiers especially in the 45W mode of the Mark V (operates in class A) where as the Roadster will only operate Class A/B. Some may claim the Mark V to have more clarity due to the Class A power section. However, the depth or character of the output seems a bit 2D or thinner than the Class A/B power section of the Roadster. Perhaps it is related to the crossover distortion of the push/pull nature of the class A/B. The Mark V does run the center tubes relatively at a hotter bias which tends to make the amp become brittle with certain guitars (single coil pups, depends on what you have) compared to the mild bias of the Dual Rectifier amplifiers. I actually prefer the Mark V in the 90W mode since it operates in Class A/B but lacks support for tube rectifier tracking since there is only one Rectifier tube. I would say both amps are very similar in character and tone. Both are great with blues or even Jazz so it is not surprising that many artists are using the Rectifier amps. Tube rectifier tracking really sounds cool at 100W with any of the channels. Run the amp in spongy mode and it gets better. The Mark V in Variac (same as spongy) also sounds good as it cuts back on some of the supersonic high frequencies. I would say that is one thing I dislike about the Mark V is the tendency for it to become brittle. I have spent more time tube rolling the Mark V just to get an non disturbing tone (not fond of breaking glass brittleness). The Roadster can be bright too, but not as severe as the Mark V. I like Jazz, Blues and classic rock as much as I like heavy metal to more modern forms of metal (what ever it is called now). Both the Mark V and Roadster are quite versatile by design and can manage a wide range of different styles of music. Even the RA100 can perform certain tasks quite well and is always a fun amp to play though.

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Silverwulf
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by Silverwulf » Sat Jul 12, 2014 3:32 pm

LesPaul70 wrote:As for jazz guitarists using Rectifiers, Allan Holdsworth has been often mentioned. An early Dual used to be his all-time favorite amp. True, it was a Rev C, which is a very different beast than the later Rectos (although I'd be surprised if a RKII, with all those voicing options and switches, couldn't get you at least close).

And you could also make a case that Allan Holdsworth isn't really a jazz guitarist. (I'm not sure what he is, actually - he's a bit difficult to categorize.)
I actually owned Holdsworth's Revision C for a while. One of the countless 2 channel models I've had over the years!
Boogie user of 20+ years, previous owner of 150+ Rectos, author of the previous "2 Channel Recto User Guide" and current "3 Channel Recto User Guide" (if I ever stop being lazy and finish it)...

AndyG
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by AndyG » Mon Jul 14, 2014 12:01 pm

Silverwulf wrote:
LesPaul70 wrote:As for jazz guitarists using Rectifiers, Allan Holdsworth has been often mentioned. An early Dual used to be his all-time favorite amp. True, it was a Rev C, which is a very different beast than the later Rectos (although I'd be surprised if a RKII, with all those voicing options and switches, couldn't get you at least close).

And you could also make a case that Allan Holdsworth isn't really a jazz guitarist. (I'm not sure what he is, actually - he's a bit difficult to categorize.)
I actually owned Holdsworth's Revision C for a while. One of the countless 2 channel models I've had over the years!

Did you end up sounding like Holdsworth? :D

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Silverwulf
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by Silverwulf » Mon Jul 14, 2014 2:10 pm

AndyG wrote:Did you end up sounding like Holdsworth? :D
I doubt if I had his entire rig and private lessons from Holdworth that I'd end up sounding even 50% like him... 8)
Boogie user of 20+ years, previous owner of 150+ Rectos, author of the previous "2 Channel Recto User Guide" and current "3 Channel Recto User Guide" (if I ever stop being lazy and finish it)...

AndyG
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by AndyG » Tue Jul 15, 2014 6:20 am

Silverwulf wrote:
AndyG wrote:Did you end up sounding like Holdsworth? :D
I doubt if I had his entire rig and private lessons from Holdworth that I'd end up sounding even 50% like him... 8)
that's why, in my opinion, he is the best guitarist out there! he's so amazingly good! :)

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elvis
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Re: jazz guitarists using rectos

Post by elvis » Sat Jul 26, 2014 12:26 am

Scott Henderson can play a mean Holdsworth, as well as some incredible blues fusion.

I was a big Holdsworth fan in the '80s and '90s, and saw him live. Sadly, I thought he processed the tone so much that it really didn't matter what he played through.
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